+View Resume+

Clare Follmann

List of Published Works

ritual // routine (Elderly Magazine, 2020)


Clare Follmann is an author, artist, and gardener located in Olympia, Washington. Her work engages with themes of landscape and sense of place and home, semiotics and language + rhetoric, history and philosophy of science, and story-telling.

From over 10 years of experience, she has helped clients feel confident sharing, publishing, or utilizing their work. She is a highly meticulous editor and focus on consistency, clarity, brevity, and accessibility in content and work.

Clare offers research, writing, and editing services. Her skills include editing, design, writing, and research. She is proficient on Microsoft Office, G Suite, WordPress, SquareSpace, Adobe, Atlas.ti, Esri, GIS, Mechanical Turk. 

She regularly works with GRuB’s Tend, Gather and Grow team to help research, design, and meticulously edit a series of curricula of 80+ lessons for educating youth and teachers on indigenous plant knowledge. She also works with herbalist Elise Krohn on her personal website to ensure content is up to date, and free of grammatical and contextual errors. For Seattle’s fruit-gleaning non-profit, City Fruit, she helped proofread, edit, and research content before transferring it to their new website. She has also worked with Author Anthea Sharp to help critique, hone, and edit several books of her USA Bestselling Young Adult Fantasy series: Feyland.

In her personal writing, Clare explores a variety of topics, using experimental non-fiction, memoir, poetry, fiction and critical interdisciplinary essay to explore material of interest.

Clare is currently working on two books. How to be at Home is a series of prose vignettes comprised of memoir, history, literature, interview, and photograph encompassing the nature of home and being at home–in the body, in a dwelling, in a community. Spellbound: The Power of the Scientific Tongue is collection of essays detailing the tyrannical power of plastic words while seeking to decolonize scientific language.

An M.S graduate from Evergreen State College, her thesis The Art of Arguing Science: A Critique of Scientific Rhetoric through the Invasive Species Narrative explores both inaccessible language and misleading militaristic rhetoric used in the scientific narrative of invasive species. She has been invited as guest speaker the Washington State Department of Natural Resources to share and engage with the work from her thesis.

Her essay The Walls of the Mind House was nominated for the 2013 Spencer Barnett Memorial Prize for Excellence in Latin American Studies, and her essay Two Tales of One City was nominated for the 2013 Lipkin Prize in the Humanities.